Young entrepreneurs dive in to start their own businesses, despite the high failure rate

Pixvana co-founder and CEO Forest Key looks around with a developer edition of HTC's Vive, a headset for SteamVR, at his company's office in Fremont. Pixvana, a company that works on virtual and augmented reality video processing, was founded in December 2015 and moved into their office space in Fremont in January. Shot for Pacific NW Mag 4/24 issue on Startups.

Pixvana co-founder and CEO Forest Key looks around with a developer edition of HTC’s Vive, a headset for SteamVR, at his company’s office in Fremont. Pixvana, a company that works on virtual and augmented reality video processing, was founded in December 2015 and moved into their office space in Fremont in January.
Shot for Pacific NW Mag 4/24 issue on Startups.

 

EVERY DAY DURING the spring of 2011, Matt Oppenheimer sat in his pajamas at the dining-room table of his aunt’s house in London, making call after call to pitch his new plan for a company. “It’s a terrible idea,” the voices on the other end of the phone told him, again and again.

Reetu Gupta spent months helping her daughter apply to The Overlake School, a private school in Redmond the 10-year-old desperately wanted to attend. Gupta paid the $2,000 deposit after her daughter was accepted. Then she dropped the whole idea so she could start her own company.

Read the rest of the article here.

Share this Article
facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmailfacebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedintumblrmail